Pola Oloixarac, marry meeee. even though you are more than 10 years older than me. so beautiful.

Pola Oloixarac, marry meeee. even though you are more than 10 years older than me. so beautiful.

Why the fuck did I not hear about this until today, a day before the final day of it’s occurrence? I could be distractedly listening to the beautiful Pola Oloixarac and pick up a copy of Ben Brooks’ novel without having to pay exorbitant shipping charges. I really hate when, with this incredibly vast web of information, some things seem to fall into all-consuming black holes.

Why the fuck did I not hear about this until today, a day before the final day of it’s occurrence? I could be distractedly listening to the beautiful Pola Oloixarac and pick up a copy of Ben Brooks’ novel without having to pay exorbitant shipping charges. I really hate when, with this incredibly vast web of information, some things seem to fall into all-consuming black holes.

—

Books I’ve Read Since Living in Germany (July 2011- Present):

July

The Blank Slate: The Modern Denial of Human Nature by Steven Pinker.
- Steven Pinker is a genius, that much is certain. There is very little I can disagree with in this book, and I think that’s a great thing. He provides a great alternative to fundamentalist arguments on how to address moral issues in society.

The Language Instinct by Steven Pinker.

August

Invisible by Paul Auster.
- My first introduction to Auster’s work. I was blown away - lot’s of surprises and a new but seemingly familiar post-modernism.

El general en su laberinto (The General In His Labyrinth) by Gabriel García Márquez.
- You’d better like history, Latin American post-revolutionary history.

September

High Fidelity by Nick Hornby (Library copy, not pictured)
- First Nick Hornby book I’ve read - didn’t realize Fever Pitch and About a Boy (the films) were based off of his books. Light reading I suppose, but this one made me laugh a good few times and I gleaned two or three quotes from it.

Noticias de un secuestro (News of a Kidnapping) by Gabriel García Márquez (Library copy, not pictured).
- I was a little put off by Márquez’s El general en su laberinto, but I saw this in the library and decided to give another go at his historical accounts. This one really pulled me in and I enjoyed it a lot. Got me interested enough to look into the victims’ lives.

Travels in the Scriptorium by Paul Auster (Library copy, not pictured).
- The situation and format of this novella really interested me, it wasn’t until I later looked up the book online that I learned that many of the characters are borrowed from his other writings - now I’ll have to go back and re-read!

A Long Way Down by Nick Hornby (Library copy, not pictured).
- Read this one out of boredom - it wasn’t particularly moving. Too surreal and too forced for my tastes.

Brooklyn Follies by Paul Auster.
- After having read two of Auster’s books, Brooklyn Follies struck me as a divergence from his typical writing style, in that everything was wrapped up beautifully in a nice package for an ending. The stories are beautiful, but they do not resemble the gritty and unresolved endings that really won me over in his other books.

Sunset Park by Paul Auster.
- Of Auster’s books that I have read thus far, this has impacted me most. It’s a perfect example of beauty and uncertainty and tragedy blended together to paint a picture of how we all are living.

Tenían veinte años y estaban locos (They Were Twenty Years Old and They Were Crazy) edited by Luna Miguel.
- A truly beautiful collection of poetry from young Spaniards. I cannot recommend it enough - although I guess ability to read Spanish is a bit of a prerequisite.

November

Las teorías salvajes by Pola Oloixarac (haven’t finished).
- Spanish is not my first language, and it shows when I try to read this book. I am really intrigued  by the characters thus far, but it’s a struggle - not aided by the fact that the writer is Argentinian (side-note: she’s also incredibly beautiful). I plan on working through this one over the winter holidays.

Leviathan by Paul Auster (currently reading).
- So far, I’m sold. Should be finished within a day or so.

Books I’ve Read Since Living in Germany (July 2011- Present):

July

The Blank Slate: The Modern Denial of Human Nature by Steven Pinker.
- Steven Pinker is a genius, that much is certain. There is very little I can disagree with in this book, and I think that’s a great thing. He provides a great alternative to fundamentalist arguments on how to address moral issues in society.

The Language Instinct by Steven Pinker.

August

Invisible by Paul Auster.
- My first introduction to Auster’s work. I was blown away - lot’s of surprises and a new but seemingly familiar post-modernism.

El general en su laberinto (The General In His Labyrinth) by Gabriel García Márquez.
- You’d better like history, Latin American post-revolutionary history.

September

High Fidelity by Nick Hornby (Library copy, not pictured)
- First Nick Hornby book I’ve read - didn’t realize Fever Pitch and About a Boy (the films) were based off of his books. Light reading I suppose, but this one made me laugh a good few times and I gleaned two or three quotes from it.

Noticias de un secuestro (News of a Kidnapping) by Gabriel García Márquez (Library copy, not pictured).
- I was a little put off by Márquez’s El general en su laberinto, but I saw this in the library and decided to give another go at his historical accounts. This one really pulled me in and I enjoyed it a lot. Got me interested enough to look into the victims’ lives.

Travels in the Scriptorium by Paul Auster (Library copy, not pictured).
- The situation and format of this novella really interested me, it wasn’t until I later looked up the book online that I learned that many of the characters are borrowed from his other writings - now I’ll have to go back and re-read!

A Long Way Down by Nick Hornby (Library copy, not pictured).
- Read this one out of boredom - it wasn’t particularly moving. Too surreal and too forced for my tastes.

Brooklyn Follies by Paul Auster.
- After having read two of Auster’s books, Brooklyn Follies struck me as a divergence from his typical writing style, in that everything was wrapped up beautifully in a nice package for an ending. The stories are beautiful, but they do not resemble the gritty and unresolved endings that really won me over in his other books.

Sunset Park by Paul Auster.
- Of Auster’s books that I have read thus far, this has impacted me most. It’s a perfect example of beauty and uncertainty and tragedy blended together to paint a picture of how we all are living.

Tenían veinte años y estaban locos (They Were Twenty Years Old and They Were Crazy) edited by Luna Miguel.
- A truly beautiful collection of poetry from young Spaniards. I cannot recommend it enough - although I guess ability to read Spanish is a bit of a prerequisite.

November

Las teorías salvajes by Pola Oloixarac (haven’t finished).
- Spanish is not my first language, and it shows when I try to read this book. I am really intrigued by the characters thus far, but it’s a struggle - not aided by the fact that the writer is Argentinian (side-note: she’s also incredibly beautiful). I plan on working through this one over the winter holidays.

Leviathan by Paul Auster (currently reading).
- So far, I’m sold. Should be finished within a day or so.

Un hombre con una teoría es alguien que tiene algo por gritar, pero un espíritu con una teoría no es mucho más que un trozo de pan a medio masticar navegando por la boca de su médium, resistiendo junto a aquellos dientes, listo para que lo fagociten, deshagan, escupan.